Assessment of the impact of race and proxies of socioeconomic status on the prevalence and health outcome of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) using the “All of Us” Databank

Nicole Blatt, Brian J. Balin, Ahmad B. Cader, C. Scott Little, Eleonora Savio-Galimberti

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentation

Abstract

Background: Peripartum Cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a form of cardiomyopathy occurring during the last month of pregnancy or within months after giving birth in women with previously normal hearts. PPCM is an idiopathic systolic dysfunction that causes a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction. The estimated incidence of PPCM worldwide is 1 diagnosis out of 2,000 live births, and the causes of PPCM remain unknown. A retrospective cohort study conducted at the University of Pennsylvania Health System by Getz et al. showed that black race and socioeconomic proxies (like neighborhood disadvantage index (NDI)) were independently associated with sustained cardiac dysfunction (Getz et al., Am Heart J 2021). This study also showed that from all the components of NDI (education, high rental occupied housing, annual income below poverty line, female headed household, adults unemployed, adults on public assistance), low education and high rental occupied housing were significantly associated with sustained cardiac dysfunction. The central aim of the present project is to assess the effect of socioeconomic proxies (including NDI, lack of access to health care and food insecurity) on the prevalence of sustained cardiac dysfunction from PPCM across the US using the “All of Us” databank. A secondary aim is to test the compliance of the "All of Us" database capacity to interrogate this potential association. Lastly, we aim to compare the results obtained from the "All of Us" database with the UK Biobank.

Methods: The "All of Us" databank (Ramirez et al., Patterns 2022; The All of US Research Program, NEJM 2019) will be used to conduct a retrospective cohort study to assess how proxies of socioeconomic status may affect the incidence and prevalence of sustained cardiac dysfunction from PPCM across different ethnicities in the US. The "All of Us" database focuses on enrolling people in the US from diverse groups that have historically been underrepresented in medical research. Therefore, it includes a more diverse population than the population targeted in the retrospective study conducted at the University of Pennsylvania in which only black women from Philadelphia, PA, were included. To further interrogate the impact that geographic location and population ethnicity may have on the prevalence of sustained cardiac dysfunction from PPCM, the results obtained from the “All of Us” database will be compared against data obtained from the UK Biobank.

Expected Results: We expect that the socioeconomic proxies interrogated in this study will have a significant impact on the prevalence of sustained cardiac dysfunction from PPCM. Current knowledge is limited on how socioeconomic status affects sustained cardiac dysfunction resulting from PPCM. Previous studies have been done on populations restricted to small geographic areas and did not analyze factors such as food security, access to care, or disability status. Understanding how these factors affect the incidence and prevalence of sustained cardiac dysfunction from PPCM may be used to improve prevention, early diagnosis, and management of PPCM.

Original languageAmerican English
StatePublished - May 3 2023

Keywords

  • Peripartum Cardiomyopathy (PPCM)

Disciplines

  • Cardiology
  • Medicine and Health Sciences

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